Best in Test – SRAM CODE RSC

Despite being branded as a ‘full bore’ DH brake, the SRAM Code RSC demonstrated deceleration values on the dyno that fell short of the big hitters. Does this mean they are no good? Not at all, in fact, on the trail the Codes have the balance just right. With huge modulation and very usable power, we found it easy to deliver the maximum braking force allowed by the conditions without locking a wheel. It’s bit like racing a Bugatti Veyron and Impreza rally car down a winding country lane: yes, the Bugatti has more power but the Scooby is far easier to drive fast. Noticeably more controllable than the SRAM Guides, the Code is very easy to dose out controlled deceleration on loose surfaces. The ergonomic and stylish RSC lever features everything you could need, with a tool-free reach adjust and a contact adjuster that really works: wind it out for almost instant pad contact and a sharper brake; wind it in for a longer, smoother lever throw. Should they need bleeding, SRAM’s clever Bleeding Edge technology ensures no mess. On the trail the Code’s initial bite is smooth, press harder and the Swing Link lever ramps up well through the stroke. Even on very long descents, the lever feel was consistent throughout and we never felt undergunned, even when testing on heavy eMTBs. After a season of hard riding we experience no significant issues, just reliable, consistent braking, but heavier riders may prefer 200 / 200 mm rotors.

The SRAM Code RSC is an exceptional brake, offering the perfect balance of power and modulation. Smooth enough for trail riding, with enough grunt for heavy-duty applications we could not fault them. It’s the best brake out there and our clear test winner!


Strengths

– Balanced power
– Great ergonomics

Weaknesses

– DOT 5.1


Price: € 270 (single)
Weight: 566 g (set, w/o rotors)

Info: sram.com

About the author

Trev Worsey

A keen biker since the early 90’s Trev began his professional career as a research scientist and statistician, but it was the lure of the mountains that finally called him. After seven years working as an international Mountain Bike Guide he joined the ENDURO team and now coordinates exciting news, reports, reviews and group tests from the UK office.