News Review

First ride review: MET Parachute MCR helmet – the return of a classic

In its day, the minimalist chin guard of the very first MET Parachute full face helmet stirred up quite a bit of controversy in the helmet market. Its successor divided the mountain bike world no less. The latest version, the MET Parachute MCR not only looks a whole lot better than its predecessor, but it also features improved safety and has become more intuitive to use. We’ve already tested it and got all the details.

The new MET Parachute MCR features a removable chin guard that’s easy to attach and detach thanks to a clever magnetic mechanism. The price: € 330.

The MET Parachute MCR in detail

Helmets with removable chin guards are a hot trend in the market. However, most of them always have at least one drawback: they are heavy, attaching the chin guard is awkward, they’re poorly ventilated or they just don’t look good. The MET Parachute MCR aims to outshine all others with its clever details and sophisticated design. The 840 g full-face helmet (455 g without the chin guard) is ASTM F-1952-15/F-2032-15 certified, featuring a MIPS system, a magnetic FIDLOCK closure and a BOA fit system for a secure and comfortable fit.

A glimpse back in time: the history of the MET Parachute from the first model to today.
With the new MET Parachute MCR, the chin guard can be removed and re-attached in no time
To remove the chin guard, you just have to turn the knobs on either side …
… and the chin guard is released from the helmet and you can pull it off to the front

MCR is MET’s acronym for what they call the Magnetic Chinbar Release – a simple system to detach the chin guard in seconds

The chin guard is made of two parts and screwed together at the front
The helmet comes with two different thickness chin pads
The round locking mechanisms lock into position magnetically

The highlight of the MET Parachute MCR is its magnetic locking mechanism, allowing you to attach and detach the chin guard very quickly. To attach the chin bar, click the left and right side into the helmet and then push the two pins into the holes provided – they lock into place magnetically. To detach the chin guard, turn the knobs on both sides to release the magnetic locking mechanism and simply pull the chin guard off to the front.

21 large air vents and specially designed air channels guarantee optimal ventilation
Warm air can easily flow out through the back of the helmet
The visor can be adjusted in two positions
With it in the high position, there is more than enough room to stow your goggles under the visor
The visor is extra flexible to minimise the rotational forces that might otherwise occur in case of a crash

The visor can be adjusted in two positions, allowing you to easily stow your goggle underneath it on climbs. 21 large vents and dedicated air channels are designed to provide optimal ventilation. The visor is made of a flexible material and thus minimises the rotational forces that could occur in a crash. However, MET don’t use screws with predetermined breaking points, as is usually the case. The helmet includes two different thickness chin pads, to optimally adjust the fit of the helmet. Speaking of fit: the height of the fit system at the back of the helmet can also be adjusted, like on the MET Roam.

The MET Parachute MCR features the MIPS system to reduce the rotational forces inflicted on the wearer’s brain in case of a crash
The BOA system ensures a secure and snug fit
The height of the harness can be adjusted to one of three settings
Thanks to the FIDLOCK buckle on the chinstrap, the helmet can be fastened with just one hand in the blink of an eye

Alle Details auf einen Blick

  • Weight: full face 840 g; open face 455 g (size M)
  • Price: € 330
  • ASTM certified (F1952-15/F2032-15)
  • flexible, adjustable visor
  • Neck-Brace compatible
  • MCR – Magnetic Chinbar Release
  • removable chin pads (2 sizes included)
  • three sizes S (52-56); M (56-58); L (58-61)
  • 21 vents with integrated air channels
  • MIPS C2 Brain Protection System
  • BOA fit system
  • integrated STRAP anchor
  • magnetic FIDLOCK buckle
  • a total of six different colour options available
The new MET Parachute MCR is available in a total of six different colours
For an additional € 35, MET also offer a sturdy carrying case – ideal for those who do a lot travelling with their helmets
The chin guard has been extensively tested and easily complies with the current ASTM standards

First review of the MET Parachute MCR

We were able to test the new MET Parachute MCR at a venue of the Enduro World Series in Canazei, as well as on our home trails. With a circumference of 58 cm and an oval head shape, we chose the medium size – in size L the Parachute MCR was a little too loose from side to side. For the chin bar, we opted for the thinner of the two pads. Attaching the chin guard is easy after a few times practising in front of a mirror, and it works on the trail without you having to take off the helmet.

At first, we eyed the locking mechanism of the MET Parachute MCR with some scepticism …
… but it only takes a few tries to get the hang of attaching the chin guard

After only a few attempts, we took off the chin guard at every opportunity, allowing you to free up your ears and chat with your riding buddies unhindered. Depending on the position of the release knob, it takes a moment to get a good grip of the lever – especially with gloves on. Since we rode without a backpack, we simply attached the chin guard to the waist regulation velcro of our pants, which worked perfectly. In the open face mode, the helmet fits snug and secure and is perfect for climbing.

On the climbs, the Parachute MCR feels like a classic open face helmet – albeit a bit heavier
We removed the chin guard for climbing and attached it to the waist regulating velcro strap of our pants – it worked just fine

The MET Parachute MCR is a true 2-in-1 helmet, performing both uphill and downhill!

On the first descent, the visor obscured our field of vision slightly in the low setting (which is still quite high). However, this can be remedied quickly and effectively by adjusting the fit system on the back of the head, making the helmet fit perfectly. The ventilation is excellent both with and without the chin guard – as far as we could tell in the cool climate that we were testing in.

Descending, the ventilation of the helmet is very good even with the chin guard attached
Even the very large SCOTT Prospect goggles fit without a problem
The fit of the MET Parachute MCR is very secure and it makes you feel safe and well protected

The large SCOTT goggles easily fit into the helmet and under the visor. Even on rough descents, the helmet stays put and makes you feel very safe. Luckily we didn’t perform a real-world crash test with the helmet. The large opening in the middle of the chin guard provides ample ventilation even when you’re sweating and breathing heavily.

Availability

The new MET Parachute MCR will be available from MET dealers and online stores by June for € 330, and you’ll have six colours to choose from. An optional, robust carrying case is available for an additional € 35.

Our conclusion on the MET Parachute MCR

The new MET Parachute MCR convinced us not only with its looks but also with the ingenious locking mechanism for the chin guard. It’s a true 2-in-1 helmet that cuts a fine figure with or without the chin guard. The secure fit, the high-quality workmanship and the smart details all left a very positive impression. Our only point of criticism: the hefty € 330 price tag.

Stärken

  • snug and secure fit
  • easy attachment of the chin guard
  • good ventilation
  • adjustability to suit every head shape

Schwächen

  • hefty price

For more information about the new MET Parachute MCR, visit the MET homepage.

Words: Christoph Bayer Photos: Christoph Bayer, Boris Beyer

About the author

Christoph Bayer

Christoph loves to be kept on his toes – both on the bike and in his role for ENDURO. He’s known as the guy in charge of the bi-monthly magazine and masquerades as both its editor and photographer. You’ll usually find him tearing up the mountains on his bike, soaking up the flow or tackling technical, narrow trails.