The Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Alloy is not only the most expensive bike of the group test, but it is also the heaviest, featuring a relatively low-end spec. Nevertheless, it ultimately turned out to be one of our test crew’s favourite bikes and for very good reason.

For an overview of the test fleet head to The best budget trail bike of 2019 – 11 mountain bikes head to head

Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 29 | 150/140 mm (f/r) | 14.90 kg | € 3,099

If you are looking for an affordable trail bike, you’ll still have to fork out if you want a Specialized. The Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 29 is the most affordable model in their portfolio, though it isn’t cheap at € 3,099. If you look at the spec, it seems a rather unattractive proposition: SRAM NX Eagle drivetrain, Guide R brakes and a FOX 34 Rhythm fork – measured in terms of price you would expect more for your money. But the Specialized has something that justifies the higher price: a high-quality frame. The bike looks amazing and it features some smart details. The ridges of the specially made chainstay protector reduce chain slap noise to a minimum, the low slung top tube offers maximum freedom of movement, the geometry can be adjusted via a flip-chip and the threaded bottom bracket facilitates easy maintenance. Like the carbon model, the aluminium counterpart has an asymmetrical brace between the top and the seat tube, which is supposed to ensure optimum stiffness. The 14.9 kg bike offers 150 mm travel up front and 140 mm at the rear. It rolls on 2.6″ Specialized Butcher and Purgatory tires front and rear respectively. However, the tires are a bit narrower than comparable MAXXIS or Schwalbe models.

The Specialized Stumpjumper is a one bike quiver, guaranteed to deliver a good time on any kind of trail!

Helmet Specialized Ambush | Glasses 100% Speedcraft | Jersey Specialized Demo Pro | Short POC Resistance Women | Shoes Ride Concept Hellion

The Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 29 in detail

Fork FOX 34 FLOAT Rhythm 150 mm
Shock FOX FLOAT DPS 140 mm
Brakes SRAM Guide R 200/180 mm
Drivetrain SRAM NX Eagle
Seatpost X-Fusion Manic 150 mm
Stem Specialized Trail 45 mm
Handlebar Specialized Trail 780 mm
Wheels Roval Traverse 29″
Tires Specialized Butcher/Purgatory 2.6″

Classy
Overall, the frame and its discreet paint job look stunning – we like!
Tuning potential
The rear suspension of the Stumpjumper isn’t progressive enough. It could be worthwhile experimenting with volume spacers. The climb switch is also a necessity on the climbs to prevent the rear end from bobbing.
Overwhelmed
Weak brake + small rotor = pumped arms. If you live in mountainous terrain, you should invest in better brakes with larger rotors.
High-quality
Where other brands save, Specialized scores: the contact points (saddle and grips) are top-notch and very comfortable.
Silenced
The specially developed chainstay protector effectively dampens chain slap, keeping it nice and quiet.
Size S M L XL
Seat tube 380 mm 410 mm 455 mm 505 mm
Top tube 573 mm 597 mm 628 mm 662 mm
Head tube 100 mm 100 mm 125 mm 140 mm
Head angle 66,5° 66,5° 66,5° 66,5°
Seat angle 74,8° 74,8° 74,8° 74,8°
Chainstays 437 mm 437 mm 437 mm 437 mm
BB Drop 33 mm 33 mm 33 mm 33 mm
Wheelbase 1,151 mm 1,171 mm 1,201 mm 1,232 mm
Reach 405 mm 425 mm 445 mm 470 mm
Stack 619 mm 619 mm 642 mm 656 mm

The Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 29 in test

There is only one thing to say about the riding position: ultra comfortable. However, it is still worthwhile pushing the saddle forward so as not to pedal with too much of your weight over the rear. The suspension is very sensitive, but it tends to suffer from pedal bob. Reaching for the climb switch on the shock is basically mandatory on the climbs. Once you’ve done so, the Stumpjumper will happily get you up long, steep climbs. Surprisingly, we hardly noticed the bike’s weight when going uphill. On the contrary, the Stumpy is made for long rides.

Tuning tip: more powerful brakes | Vvolume spacer in the shock

It’s a phenomenon: you’ll immediately feel at home aboard a Specialized. This is generally due to moderate geometry and the Stumpy is no exception. Going by the numbers, it’s very conservative, almost old-fashioned. But you don’t notice that on the trail, where the Specialized’s agility and pop will have you grinning from ear to ear. The suspension easily absorbs small and fast consecutive hits. However, it lacks the capability to deal with harsh landings, where it will bottom out. Aggressive riders are advised to increase the progression with the help of volume spacers in the shock. With the Stumpy as your weapon of choice, you can easily take on long and rough alpine descents, or even sign up for the occasional enduro race, as long as you upgrade the brakes first. However, due to its short reach, it isn’t the most composed bike in the test field either.

Less is more! Specialized proves that a bike can be very good even without extreme geometry.

Conclusion

The Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 29 convinced our test crew with its high-quality frame as well as the beautifully balanced and fun handling. Besides which, the bike is very comfortable and perfectly suited for long rides. The rear suspension could do with a little more progression for aggressive riding, and the climb switch is a necessity it can’t do without. It’s not a bargain either.

Tops

  • lots of fun
  • easy, intuitive handling
  • aesthetically pleasing
  • highly versatile

Flops

  • pedal

Riding Characteristics

12

Uphill

1
  1. sluggish
  2. efficient

Agility

2
  1. cumbersome
  2. playful

Stability

3
  1. nervous
  2. confident

Handling

4
  1. unbalanced
  2. balanced

Suspension

5
  1. harsh
  2. plush

Fun Factor

6
  1. planted
  2. poppy

Value for money

7
  1. terrible
  2. very good

Technical Data

Specialized
Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 29

Size: S M L XL
Weight: 14,90 kg
Travel (f/r): 150/140 mm
Wheel Size: 29"
Price: € 3,099

Intended Use

XC 8
Trail 9
Enduro 10
Downhill 11

For more info head to: specialized.com

The test field

For an overview of the test fleet head to The best budget trail bike of 2019 – 11 mountain bikes head to head

All bikes in test: Canyon Spectral CF 7.0 | FOCUS JAM 6.8 NINE | Giant Trance 29 2 | MERIDA ONE FORTY 800 | Propain Tyee AM Performance | RADON SLIDE TRAIL 8.0 | ROSE PIKES PEAK AM1 | SCOTT Genius 950 | Trek Remedy 8 | YT JEFFSY 27 AL Base

Words & Photos: Christoph Bayer

About the author

Christoph Bayer

Christoph loves to be kept on his toes – both on the bike and in his role for ENDURO. He’s known as the guy in charge of the bi-monthly magazine and masquerades as both its editor and photographer. You’ll usually find him tearing up the mountains on his bike, soaking up the flow or tackling technical, narrow trails.