What’s more irritating than a flat? Well, when you’ve turned your tyres tubeless in an effort to stop pinch punctures…not much! Where Dynaplug comes in pretty handy then, is the ability to fix a normally ride-ending disaster with a simple, brass tipped rubber ‘plug’ to fill the hole. Don’t go getting any ideas now…

Dynaplug as a company started out in 1991 creating tubeless repair devices for motorbikes, claiming to fix 98% of all tubeless punctures and now, in 2015, they’ve entered into the market for mountain bikes. “It doesn’t require any reaming, chemicals, adhesive or waiting time. Simply remove the puncture object and insert the repair plug.” They also claim to not be limited to just motorbikes and bicycles, but to cars, lorries and, well just about anything that’s tubeless.

CNC-alloy machined outer shell not only looks stylish, but is super light. You won't even notice it's in your bag/jersey
CNC-alloy machined outer shell not only looks stylish, but is super light. You won’t even notice it’s in your bag/jersey
Inside, all the tools your need to repair your tubeless puncture is readily available, with one side of the casing being using for leverage.
Inside, all the tools your need to repair your tubeless puncture is readily available, with one side of the casing being using for leverage.

If you’re on the final stretch of the ride and feeling slightly depleted, grab an energy gel and get pushing. Firstly and most annoyingly, depending on how worn your tyres are, some serious power needs to be applied to penetrate the outer shell. Not a downside of the product, but one to be aware of if you’re out for a long ride. Don’t worry, as you know, with tubeless tyres, rim tape is applied so even if you go too far, you hopefully won’t damage the inner rim.

The actual process is super simple. Remove the object that has caused a puncture and insert the plug. Of course, there are certain situations where the tool won’t work, such as sidewall punctures and obviously if you’re ever unfortunate enough to get a monstrous slice/chunk out of your tyre. Apart from that, it’s all done on the rim, so no removal of the tyre is necessary.

Insert, pull out. Tubeless repairs made easy with the insertion tool!
Insert, pull out. Tubeless repairs made easy with the insertion tool!

The outer shell/casing of the Dynaplug is intended as a sort of lever for the plugs, which once again, to be noted, are incredibly sharp and not one to be trifled with.

Top tip: Don’t lose the casing for the plugs. In testing, many fingers were pricked and a lot of blood was lost. Please note: no blood was lost, but we’re sure if you didn’t have the casing and you fell on one of these, you’d struggle to get them out. Lethal.

Screw in, screw out outer casing. Just insert the plug into the casing and push...as hard as you possibly can.
Screw in, screw out outer casing. Just insert the plug into the casing and push…as hard as you possibly can.

Credit to the creators who have seemingly not only thought of usability and a stylish exterior, but the size and weight of the Dynaplug both seem pretty awesome with its sleek, machined-alloy design, but is comparative in weight to the pair of sunglasses you’ve got sitting on your shelf at home.

All components screw perfectly into one side of the product.
All components screw perfectly into one side of the product.
Does this not remind you of the barrel of a gun? Lock, stock and two smoking punctures.
Does this not remind you of the barrel of a gun? Lock, stock and two smoking punctures.

In conclusion, the Dynaplug is a ‘does what it says on the tin’ kinda product. Fixing punctures quickly and efficiently, without it being a quick stop-gap solution until you get home. After ten rides with a hole filled with the plugs supplied, my tyres were still running strong and looked suitable for yet another. A great solution, at a great price.

Price: $54.99
Inside the box: 5 tyre repair plugs (pointed tip) 2 insertion tubes, 1 micro knife, 1 air stopper, 1 clearing attachment and 1 pipe cleaner.

For more info, visit: dynaplug.com

Words & Photos: Andrew Richardson